Take a Trip Back in Time With These 11 Iconic Liqueur Posters

Vintage advertisement from Marie Brizard

“Iconic” is a word that gets tossed around a lot these days, sometimes with little regard for accuracy. Even Merriam-Webster, keepers of the modern-day English lexicon, throw shade at the commercialization of the term on its definition page: “Today, companies and magazines and TV hosts are constantly encouraging us to think of some consumer item or pop star or show as first-rate or immortal or flawless [...] when he or she or it is actually nothing of the kind,” they write. A modern-day reality television star or brand of sneakers? Not quite iconic. But a brand with nearly three centuries of history and the visual evolution of their artwork to prove it? Well, yes: we're inclined to believe that kind of legacy lines up with that of a cultural icon (even by Merriam-Webster's stringent terms).

As we mentioned earlier this week, one of our favorite aspects of liqueur is how it has, a category, withstood the test of time, transcending trend and putting a unique stamp on each passing cocktail era. The same can be said for its advertisements, too, especially when you're talking about a portfolio of liqueurs centuries in the making. Marie Brizard, established in 1855 by the company's namesake, has a longstanding history and the archives to prove it. (Don't miss our recent foray into their old recipe books — there just might be a hidden gem worth resurrecting.) The company's visual identity is just as memorable as the liquids in their bottles: often whimsical, playfully chic and quintessentially French.

Because we're suckers for history and we love a good vintage find, we decided to sift through Marie Brizard's early to mid-twentieth century advertisements and posters. While the artwork and the tone shifts over the years, each bears an unmistakeable Marie Brizard quality, from the lighthearted romance at the tail end of the Gilded Age to the bright and bold colors of mid-century modern. Below, we take a look at some of Marie Brizard's most iconic, memorable advertisements and posters, each embodying its respective era in different ways. Read on to see how this legacy brand's visual identity has shifted through the years:


A Marie Brizard advertisement from 1913. A Marie Brizard advertisement from 1913. (Photo: Marie Brizard)

This advertisement, released one year before Europe would be beset by war, exudes a carefree and almost celebratory spirit.


A Marie Brizard poster from 1928. A Marie Brizard poster from 1928. (Photo: Marie Brizard)A circa-1928 illustration showcases Marie Brizard's growing portfolio, which at this point included an apricot brandy, kummel (an herbal liqueur with a notable caraway presence), and cacao "chouao," a rich liqueur with flavors of vanilla and chocolate.


A Marie Brizard advertisement from 1932. A Marie Brizard advertisement from 1932. (Photo: Marie Brizard)Above, a model sips Marie Brizard's infamous anisette over ice after a dip in the ocean.


Marie Brizard advertisement from 1937. Marie Brizard advertisement from 1937. (Photo: Marie Brizard)Marie Brizard celebrates "two centuries of tradition" in their bicentennial year.


Marie Brizard advertisement from 1939. Marie Brizard advertisement from 1939. (Photo: Marie Brizard)A playful model states her preference for Marie Brizard. We'll have what she's having.


Marie Brizard advertisement from 1939. Marie Brizard advertisement from 1939. (Photo: Marie Brizard)This bold advertisement takes a sharp turn from the previous years' feminine aesthetics and embraces the striking visuals of Art Deco.


Marie Brizard advertisement from 1949. Marie Brizard advertisement from 1949. (Photo: Marie Brizard)

Marie Brizard advertisement from 1950. Marie Brizard advertisement from 1950.

Marie Brizard advertisement from 1953. Marie Brizard advertisement from 1953. (Photo: Marie Brizard)

Marie Brizard advertisement from 1953. Marie Brizard advertisement from 1953.

Marie Brizard advertisement from 1961. Marie Brizard advertisement from 1961. (Photo: Marie Brizard)Here, Marie Brizard embraces the freewheeling spirit (and fashions) of the early '60s.